Natasha Khan

Reporter | PublicSource

nkhan@publicsource.org
412.315.0261

Natasha Khan is a PublicSource reporter who covers the environment. Originally from Ann Arbor, Michigan, she graduated with a master's degree from Arizona State University's Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communications where she specialized in multimedia coverage of border issues and politics.

After two years working with children in South Africa, she decided that journalism best fit her love of learning about others and her sense of adventure.

She has been published in The Washington Post, NBC.com and The Sacramento Bee.

Topics

Content by Natasha Khan

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Preparing for the PA pipeline boom

Pennsylvania’s big pipeline boom is steadily on its way, and the state is preparing for its arrival with a new task force aimed at establishing best practices for keeping massive infrastructure projects safe.

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Study: Bad economy, not fracking, main force behind U.S. drop in carbon emissions

A new analysis has found that fracking for natural gas in the United States has only played a small role in the nation’s recent decrease in carbon emissions, and that the drop was mainly caused by the Great Recession.

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The Friday derailment roundup

Derailment after derailment. They just keep happening.

Since early February, there have been at least seven train derailments in North America carrying crude from North Dakota’s Bakken Shale. These accidents have sparked increased calls from citizens, the rail industry and lawmakers for the federal government to increase safety regulations.

To keep up with these incidents and new safety regulations, PublicSource provides a roundup of stories every Friday.

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Advocates ask EPA to consider pollution’s effect on prisoners

Ninety-one social justice, prisoners’ rights and environmental groups want the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] to consider the millions of prisoners across the nation when strategizing how to help communities harmed by industrial pollution.

News post

The Friday derailment roundup

Derailment after derailment. They just keep happening.

Since early February, there have been at least six train derailments in North America carrying crude from North Dakota’s Bakken Shale. These accidents have sparked increased calls from citizens, the rail industry and lawmakers for the federal government to increase safety regulations.

To keep up with these incidents and new safety regulations, PublicSource provides a roundup of stories every Friday.

News post

The Friday derailment roundup

Derailment after derailment. They just keep happening.

Since early February, there have been at least six train derailments in North America carrying crude from North Dakota’s Bakken Shale. These accidents have sparked increased calls from citizens, the rail industry and lawmakers for the federal government to increase safety regulations.

To keep up with these incidents and new safety regulations, PublicSource provides a roundup of stories every Friday.*

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Yesterday was a big deal for global climate policy

In a big day for the fight against climate change, political leaders worldwide made promises Tuesday to significantly cut greenhouse gas emissions. The announcements come just five months before a United Nations meeting in Paris aimed at coming up with a first-of-its-kind international climate pact

News post

The Friday derailment roundup

Derailment after derailment. They just keep happening.

Since early February, there have been at least six train derailments in North America carrying crude from North Dakota’s Bakken Shale. These accidents have sparked increased calls from citizens, the rail industry and lawmakers for the federal government to increase safety regulations.

To keep up with these incidents and new safety regulations, PublicSource provides a roundup of stories every Friday.

In-depth news

Two men. One coal-ash dump. No answers.

George “Sonny” Markish stood in his yard with a TV reporter in April 2013 and pointed to a towering hill next to his house in LaBelle, Fayette County.

The camera zoomed in on Markish, with slicked-back gray hair, swiping his hand across a window sill coated in a dusty substance.

“When I come out here my eyes begin to water,” he told the Christian Broadcasting Network reporter. “I can taste foul things, and I see dust that is coming from the dump.”

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A PA court strikes down law that bolstered NRA gun challenges

In a big victory for Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto and other state and local politicians, a state court Thursday threw out a law that aided the National Rifle Association in challenging local gun ordinances in court.

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