Natasha Khan

Reporter | PublicSource

nkhan@publicsource.org
412.315.0261

Natasha Khan is a PublicSource reporter who covers the environment. Originally from Ann Arbor, Michigan, she graduated with a master's degree from Arizona State University's Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communications where she specialized in multimedia coverage of border issues and politics.

After two years working with children in South Africa, she decided that journalism best fit her love of learning about others and her sense of adventure.

She has been published in The Washington Post, NBC.com and The Sacramento Bee.

Topics

Content by Natasha Khan

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Study: Fracking releases “cancer-causing” chemicals into the air way above EPA safety standards

People living near shale gas operations in densely-fracked parts of Ohio may be getting exposed to dangerous levels of toxic air pollutants many times higher than the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency deems safe.

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The Friday derailment roundup

Derailment after derailment. They just keep happening.

Since early February, there have been at least six train derailments in North America carrying crude from North Dakota’s Bakken Shale. These accidents have sparked increased calls from citizens, the rail industry and lawmakers for the federal government to increase safety regulations.

To keep up with these incidents and new safety regulations, PublicSource provides a roundup of stories every Friday.

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CDC map shows “distinctive” ways Americans die each year by state

People in Pennsylvania and other coal-mining states are disproportionately more likely to die from black lung disease than the rest of the country.

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The Friday derailment roundup

Derailment after derailment. They just keep happening.

Since early February, there have been at least six train derailments in North America carrying crude from North Dakota’s Bakken Shale. These accidents have sparked increased calls from citizens, the rail industry and lawmakers for the federal government to increase safety regulations.

To keep up with these incidents and new safety regulations, PublicSource provides a roundup of stories every Friday.

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No crude oil in tank cars near Amtrak crash … but what if there had been?

But is it that unlikely a scenario that a passenger train could hit tankers full of crude oil? Especially when you consider how much crude-oil traffic is in Philadelphia?

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Philly train derailment

More details are flooding in about the deadly Amtrak train crash in Philadelphia. At least seven people were killed and more than 200 injured. Federal safety officials confirmed that the train was moving at more than 100 mph, which is double the speed limit allowed on those tracks.

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The Friday derailment roundup

Another train bites the dust.

It was a busy week for crude-by-rail news. Once again we saw images of fires and massive clouds of black smoke ballooning into the air after another train derailed in a small North Dakota town. That's at least six crude oil trains that have derailed in North America this year.

This latest derailment happened days after the the U.S. government, under intense public pressure, announced a two-years-in-the-making rule package to boost crude-by-rail safety, which many, including some environmental groups and the railroad and oil industries, are unhappy with.

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Another crude oil train blows up, N.D. town evacuated

Boom. It happened again.

A train carrying crude oil fracked from the Bakken Shale exploded in North Dakota Wednesday, causing the evacuation of a small town. The derailment happened days after the federal government announced two-years-in-the-making rules aimed at boosting safety for trains hauling crude oil.

In-depth news

8 facts about the shale gas industry’s air pollution

The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection recently released data on air emissions from the shale gas industry in 2013.

PublicSource looked into the data and built a series of interactive charts so you can more easily explore the information.

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The Friday derailment roundup

Derailment after derailment. They just keep happening.

Since early February, there have been at least five train derailments in North America carrying crude from North Dakota’s Bakken Shale. And there have been several minor derailments in Pennsylvania over the past two years. These accidents have sparked increased calls from citizens, the rail industry and lawmakers for the federal government to increase safety regulations.

To keep up with these incidents and new safety regulations, PublicSource will provide a roundup of stories every Friday.

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