Is the future of Pittsburgh’s labor in its smallest immigrant communities?

The labor movement, as we know it, is dying. In Pittsburgh, like in many metropolitan areas, unions are seeing a decline in their membership rolls and an aging workforce. The future of labor may be in Pittsburgh’s smallest immigrant community. “We need to focus on how we are going to diversify Pittsburgh more effectively,” said Dr. James Craft, a professor of business administration in the Joseph M. Katz Graduate School of Business at the University of Pittsburgh. It is predicted that one out of two entrants into the United States workforce in 2050 will be Latino.

Graphic: Pittsburgh’s affordable housing shortage

The following graphic represents the 17,241 affordable housing units Pittsburgh needs to provide for all households earning 50 percent of the city's median household income or less. For the full story on Pittsburgh's affordable housing shortage, read our explainer: What you need to know about affordable housing (or lack thereof) in Pittsburgh

Source: Pittsburgh Housing Needs Assessment, Mullin & Lonergan Associates

The Penn Plaza apartment complex in East Liberty. (Photo by Maranie Rae Staab/PublicSource)

The City of Pittsburgh is taking Penn Plaza owners to court over alleged broken promises

Update: On Thursday morning (Feb. 23, 2017), the City of Pittsburgh and representatives from LG Realty Advisors met in the City-County building to try to resolve the lawsuit brought by the city. After private deliberations, the city and Pennley Park South, an LG subsidiary, agreed to continue negotiating in private, to meet again in court on March 3 and to refrain from public comment. “I’d like to thank the parties...for agreeing today to try to refrain from comment and hopefully reach a settlement,” said Judge John McVay, who is overseeing the case. “I don’t know if we will, but I do believe that sometimes we make it worse in the courtroom and the media.”

Yesterday, affordable housing activists rallied.

Peduto lauded among U.S. mayors, but knows Pittsburgh has much more to figure out during Trump presidency

Mayor Bill Peduto looked glum. Soon-to-be Vice President Mike Pence was on the stage speaking before a packed ballroom at the 85th winter meeting of the United States Conference of Mayors. Peduto sat in the back listening along with other mayors, aides and staffers. Pence’s speech, delivered to an audience of about 500 people, focused little on the nitty gritty — he advocated for infrastructure investment, education reform and more support for law enforcement, but he didn’t go into details on policy plans or execution. The former Indiana governor catered to his audience, emphasizing that “mayors are on the front line of public service,” and that “this new administration will work in partnership with city halls all across America.”

As Pence concluded his speech to less-than-enthusiastic applause, Peduto muttered.